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Foot Trouble Data Base

What Causes Mortons Neuroma


Morton neuromaMorton's neuroma is a condition that affects one of the nerves between the toes. It's also known as Morton's metatarsalgia or interdigital neuroma. In Morton's neuroma, fibrous tissue develops around the nerve, which becomes irritated and compressed. This causes severe pain on the ball of the foot and at the base of the toes. Morton's neuroma can occur on one foot or both feet. It usually affects the nerve between the third and fourth toes, but sometimes the second and third toes are affected.


Morton's neuroma is an inflammation caused by a buildup of fibrous tissue on the outer coating of nerves. This fibrous buildup is a reaction to the irritation resulting from nearby bones and ligaments rubbing against the nerves. Irritation can be caused by Wearing shoes that are too tight. Wearing shoes that place the foot in an awkward position, such as high heels. A foot that is mechanically unstable. Repetitive trauma to the foot such as from sports activities like tennis, basketball, and running. Trauma to the foot caused by an injury such as a sprain or fracture. It is unusual for more than one Morton's neuroma to occur on one foot at the same time. It is rare for Morton's neuroma to occur on both feet at the same time.


Pain is usually increased by forefoot weight bearing activities (such as running), with narrow-fitting footwear, or with high heeled shoes. It is usually painful to firmly touch the affected region and, in chronic cases, pain and sometimes an audible click, may be heard when squeezing the foot and toes together with the hand. Often a localized area of swelling may be evident at the site of injury.


The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Initial diagnosis of Morton's neuroma is based on your description of the type and location of pain and discomfort in the foot. The diagnosis will be confirmed by a physical exam of the foot, including checking for mechanical abnormalities in the foot, squeezing the side of the foot, which will usually cause pain when Morton's neuroma is present. Examination of your shoes to check for excess wear in parts of the shoe, check to see whether the shoes are too tight. Imaging tests evaluate the foot and surrounding structures. This may be done with X-ray, MRI scan, Ultrasound. Injections of local anesthetic can also be used for diagnosis.

Non Surgical Treatment

You may need a metatarsal pad if wider shoes do not help relieve your Morton?s neuroma symptoms. A metatarsal pad will help spread your metatarsal bones and reduce pressure on your affected nerve as it travels under the ball of your foot. The placement of your metatarsal pad is important, and it is best placed by a foot care professional who has experience in the anatomy of the forefoot and Morton?s neuroma treatment.plantar neuroma

Surgical Treatment

If conservative treatments haven't helped, your doctor might suggest injections. Some people are helped by the injection of steroids into the painful area. In some cases, surgeons can relieve the pressure on the nerve by cutting nearby structures, such as the ligament that binds together some of the bones in the front of the foot. Surgical removal of the growth may be necessary if other treatments fail to provide pain relief. Although surgery is usually successful, the procedure can result in permanent numbness in the affected toes.